Text Size: Zoom In

Christ and the Data gods

Israel Museum Apple Sculpture

The good news of our age is that information is king. Knowledge rules. So by desktop, smartphone, or tablet, we have instant global access to the exploding journalistic, scientific, and commercial data of the world—sort of.

The challenge is that we have a bit of an issue getting past the unnerving discovery that every question seems to have alternative answers, each of which uses the available data to support a different economic theory, biblical interpretation, or political agenda.

From ancient times the problem has always been that only fools dismiss the need for knowledge and understanding. Yet, who can deny that the Solomons of the world too often end up making late night comedians sound like the real wise guys.

The Apostle Paul probably seems more prophetic now than in the day that he wrote about those who were always learning but never able to come to the knowledge of the truth (2Tim 3:7).  He had seen the way the Greek philosophers and intellectual gossips of Mars Hill were obsessed with being at a place where they could always hear or say something new (Acts 17:21).

Have been wondering what he would think about my approach to Bible study, doctrine, and theology?

Seems that I’ve been around long enough now to see that any part of the Bible can be done to know Christ, his love, his joy, what hurts him, and why I need him– now (Phil 3:8-11). Or, as too often has been the case,  I can use any study of any part of the Bible in worship of the data gods, with the result that I may be the last to see what others are probably suspecting—that it’s been awhile since I’ve been with Christ (1Cor 13:1-3).


Vote on whether you think this post is something you'll be thinking about:
Vote This Post DownVote This Post Up (+53 rating, 53 votes)
Loading...
70 Comments »

70 Responses to “Christ and the Data gods”

  1. remarutho says:

    Good Morning Mart & Friends –

    Mart, you wrote:

    “The Apostle Paul probably seems more prophetic now than in the day that he wrote about those who were always learning but never able to come to the knowledge of the truth (2 Tim 3:7). He had seen the way the Greek philosophers and intellectual gossips of Mars Hill were obsessed with being at a place where they could always hear or say something new (Acts 17:21).”

    In the Random House dictionary published in 1954 the verb “convict” still carries the same (archaic) definition as “convince.” That definition is to “overcome or vanquish – or prove.” I do not hear commentators and pundits talking much about being convicted of anything, never mind sin. It is not sophisticated to be “overcome” by the immense holy Presence of our God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

    The spirit of our age will not be convinced, that is convicted of its sin. There is always an answer back, a contradiction or a question. In this we do resemble the Greeks and the Romans. They had become great philosophers, not people of faith. It was the Jews who supposedly upheld belief in God.

    Jesus told the story of the rich man and Lazarus, the beggar who lay at the gate of the rich man’s estate. When all was said and done, both Lazarus and the rich man were dead, with father Abraham. The final word to the hard-hearted religious leaders is: “If they do not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.” (Luke 16:31)

    Paul teaches that “faith comes by what is heard, and what is heard comes through the word of Christ.” (Romans 10:17) There is more going on in this than a simple, fair hearing of Scripture. The word of Christ is the word of faith – the conviction of my own sinfulness – the witness of God’s overcoming grace and power. The arrow of God’s love finds its mark in the sinful heart and overcomes every objection. It is not popular to “die to self” in 2012.

    Blessings,
    Maru

  • yooperjack says:

    For start: Money (wealth) rules.